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Emotional and Mental Health

Emotional health is very important to ones overall wellbeing.

Many of the consultations at Mt Martha Village Clinic involve helping our patients with their emotional health concerns.

All of our Doctors are keen to help with his important aspect of health care.

These consultations frequently require longer than the standard 10-15 minutes set aside for a normal visit, so it is helpful if you ask for a longer appointment when you call.

As well as counselling with your doctor, we are able to refer you to psychologists who are specially trained in counselling techniques, or psychiatrists who are specialist in mental health illnesses.


Your doctor may speak to you about making a “mental health care treatment plan” if appropriate and if you are eligible. Most mental health care plans are developed for people who suffer from various forms of anxiety or depressions. This assists with planning your total care, and can allow you to receive a subsidy from medicare if you wish to see a psychologist, which makes the counselling much more affordable.

Poor Mental Health can greatly reduce enjoyment of life and relationships, and the most severe expression of this is self harm and suicide. 


Someone who is thinking about suicide will usually give some clues or signs to those around them that show they are troubled. Suicide prevention starts with recognising these warning signs and taking them seriously.  The following is a list of signs that people might give when they are feeling distraught and overwhelmed, in order to communicate their distress to others. These physical changes and behaviours are indicators that a person might be thinking about suicide. Some of these signs are stronger indicators that a person may be contemplating suicide.


It is likely that a suicidal person will display a combination of these signs rather than one single sign. 

Physical changes

 
  • major changes to sleeping patterns – too much or too little
  • loss of energy
  • loss of attention to personal hygiene or appearance
  • loss of interest in sex
  • sudden and extreme changes in eating habits – either loss of appetite or increase in appetite
  • weight gain or loss
  • increase in minor illnesses
 
 

Behaviours

 
  • alcohol or drug misuse
  • fighting and/or breaking the law
  • withdrawal from family and friends
  • quitting activities that were previously important
  • prior suicidal behaviour
  • self-harming
  • putting affairs in order e.g. giving away possessions, especially those that have special significance for the person
  • writing a suicide note or goodbye letters to people
  • uncharacteristic risk-taking or recklessness (e.g. driving recklessly)
  • unexplained crying
  • emotional outbursts

Conversational signs

 
  • no future – “What’s the point? Things are never going to get any better.”
  • guilt – “It’s all my fault, I’m to blame.”
  • escape – “I can’t take this anymore.”
  • alone – “I’m on my own…no-one cares about me.”
  • damaged – “I’ve been irreparably damaged… I’ll never be the same again.”
  • helpless – “Nothing I do makes a bit of difference, it’s beyond my control.”
  • talking about suicide or death
  • planning for suicide
 

Feelings

 
  • sadness
  • anger
  • shame
  • desperation
  • disconnection
  • hopelessness
  • worthlessness
  • powerlessness
  • loneliness
  • isolation

These are other useful links including ones from Peninsula Health

Various forms of anxiety or depressions. This assists with planning your total care, and can allow you to receive a subsidy from medicare if you wish to see a psychologist, which makes the counselling much more affordable.

Emergency/Crisis care:

 

There are several emergency numbers you can call. 

 

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During office hours call Mt Martha Village clinic if you feel you need to see a doctor urgently. If you are already seeing a psychologist you may be able to call them.
  • After hours you can call Peninsula Health 1300 792 977
  • Try not to be alone – call family or friends.

This information is from the site below – please have a look.  It includes options for help and action to prevent harm and lead to better health

Link to further information about mental health care:

For Emergency contact details